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Truco is Spanish for "trick". Truco is an Apricot phase (which is why each band of yellow and red has an orange hue) Pueblan Milk snake, Lampropeltis triangulum campbelli, from south central Mexico. Certain Milk snakes have white in place of yellow, but generally all Milk snakes are Coral snake mimics. The three colors, red, yellow, and black are the same on both the venomous Coral snake and the non-venomous Milk snake, but the sequence is different. On the Milk snake the sequence is black, yellow, black, red, black, yellow, etc. On the Coral snake the sequence is black, yellow, red, yellow, black, yellow, red, etc. The easiest way to remember is to say the old rhyme, "Red and yellow will kill a fellow. Red and black is a friend to Jack." The safest course of action if you come across a snake while you are out camping or hiking is to just keep your distance. If you are close enough to see the color sequence, you are probably close enough to be in harm's way if it is a venomous snake. It is also important to note that once you leave the North American continent, color and pattern of Milk snakes and Coral snakes will vary and the old rhyme will not necessarily hold true. The image to the left below Truco is a Texas Coral snake, Micrurus tener, photo by and Dave Barker of VPI.



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HONDO is a Honduran Milk snake, Lampropeltis triangulum hondurensis, and is found in the Rainforests of Honduras, Nicaragua and portions of North East Costa Rica. They get BIG. Often over four feet, soemtimes in excess of six feet long, they are voracious feeders and usually do well in captivity. The hondurensis has only been known for a few decades, but has bred well in captivity and subsequently has become so popular with herpetoculturist that the market is currently oversaturated with the most common color morphs. My hondurensis is a tangerine phase (morph) and contrary to common behavior traits, she has a really sweet disposition which makes her an excellent addition to my SnakeTalk program.



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Brit and Sirius are Corn snakes, Pantherophis guttatus guttatus (Formerly Elaphe guttata guttata). Brit is a male, and is heterozygous (looks normal but carries a recessive trait). Sirious is female, an albino, labeled as a "Snow" in the trade. This pair is another adoption for SnakeTalk. I have found that in spite of the pleasant nature of these snakes and how well suited they are to captivity, they are surplus to my presentation needs. On 06 February 2009 the pair was adopted out to a new home.

Corn snakes are found throughout the south eastern United States. The Corn snake makes an excellent pet for the first time keeper. They have long been bred in captivity, and are very easy to care for. Also, since they are a temperate zone snake, there is no need to heat the cage as long as you keep your thermostat set around 70° F in the winter. There are variables to consider, but if you read Don Soderberg's book, Corn Snakes in Captivity, you will have no question unanswered.

www.cornsnake.net



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Overdraft is a Bullsnake, Pituophis melanoleucus sayi, and is found throughout the central plains of North America all the way from southern Canada down into northern Mexico. Overdraft is a Rattlesnake mimic. The color and pattern of the Bullsnakes is very similar to the Diamondback Rattlesnakes which share their range. This Bullsnake along with three siblings was captured inside my bank. As best as can be determined, a female adult Bullsnake layed a clutch of eggs (summer, 2008) near the foundation espanaviagra.net and several of the hatchlings entered into the bank through cracks in the slab. One of the employees of the bank managed to coerce the first snake found inside into a trash can and then released it into the brush behind the bank. When a second snake was found, the bank manager called me. Over the course of the next few days I was called to remove three more snakes from the bank. Now that the wheather has turned cold, snake sightings in and around the bank have ceased. Overdraft's siblings are named Teller, Debit, and Ledger. The image to the left below Overdraft is a Western Diamondback Rattlesnake, Crotalus atrox, photo by and Dave Barker of VPI.



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Caddyshack is a Sonoran Gopher snake, Pituophis catenifer affinis, and is found from the western tip of Texas across New Mexico and Arizona to south eastern California and south into south central Mexico. Caddyshack is another of my Rattlesnake mimics. The color and pattern of the Sonoran Gopher snake tends toward a yellow hue as opposed to the more nuetral tones of the Bullsnake, but is still similar to the Diamondback Rattlesnake in general appearance, demonstrating once again that discretion is always the best course when it comes to interaction with snakes in the wild.


Available for adoption to a good home in the DFW area.
(will not ship - local pick-up ONLY)
Adopted out 23 June, 2009.



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Stripe is a Colombian Boa Constrictor, Boa constrictor imperator. Boa Constrictors are tropical snakes that range from north central Mexico down into South America. The Colombian is the most common variety of pet Boa having been imported in great numbers for many years and also because it has been bred prolifically in captivity for the past couple of decades. Stripe was born in captivity 02/May/2002 along with more than 30 siblings. Stripe is the only one I kept from that brood.

Baby Boa constrictors


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Glory is also a Colombian Boa Constrictor, Boa constrictor imperator, but I have little information on her origins. I adopted Glory in 2006 after she was seized by Animal Control. Glory is a very mild tempered snake, and very well adjusted to handling by many people which is what makes her an ideal snake for my SnakeTalk presentations. She is about 6.5' long. Since I don't accurately know her age, I may choose to retire her from the presentations soon. She is healthy and even though she is not very large for a Boa constrictor, I have a gut feeling that she may be in excess of 15 years old and should perhaps have limited stress placed on her.



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Ponder is a female Colombian Boa Constrictor, Boa constrictor imperator from a brood of 12, born in captivity on 26/July/2007. Her mother is Glory (shown above). Her father was a nameless male owned by a friend. Ponder is the only individual I kept from this brood. The remaining snakes were adopted out to friends. I derived her name from not being able to decide on a name for her.

Baby Boa constrictors


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Banana is a great teaching aid, but sometimes he just likes to go meet people.
Banana & people slide show

Banana is a Burmese Python, Python molurus bivittatus, an albino, or more specifically an amelanistic (lacking black pigment) colored Burmese. Banana is definitely a male. He is approximately 8' in length, and will reach his maximum length of 12' or 14' within the next three or four years. I adopted Banana in February 2007, so I know nothing of his origins. Banana is very cooperative and mild tempered, but has a somewhat aggressive feeding response. Because of this trait he would not be a good snake for a new herpetoculturist. I really have to have my wits about me when I am feeding Banana. It should be noted that female Burmese Pythons may reach lengths well in excess of 18 feet. Although I feel captive propagation of snakes is essential to the continued survival of many species, I will not breed Burmese Pythons. I have a need for the Burmese in my SnakeTalk presentations, but feel that there is no need to increase the captive population of this species... typically, people just don't need a 14' to 20' snake as a pet.


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Ball Pythons, Python regius live in arid scrub regions in Africa, and are imported annually in great numbers for the pet trade. The Ball Python will make a fine pet if cared for properly. The absolute best book available on the Ball Python is Pythons of the World, Vol. II: BALL PYTHONS, The History, Natural History, Care, and Breeding by Dave and Tracy Barker. There is also a DVD, All About Ball Pythons, available at VPI.Com for only $23.95. Either way, you can't go wrong getting your information from Dave and Tracy.



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Banjo is a female with strong colors and reduced pattern.


Available for adoption to a good home in the DFW area.
(will not ship - local pick-up ONLY)
Adopted out 06 February, 2009.



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Gimme is a male "Pastel" Ball Python, Python regius, a co-dominant genetic trait. Unlike recessive traits, such as albino or anerythristic, a co-dominant trait will produce (theoretically) offspring in equal numbers to the mate. For instance, if you breed a Pastel with a Normal, you will get 50% Pastel and 50% Normal from the mating. With a simple recessive trait, such as albino, to normal pairing, you will get 100% heterozygous (look normal but carry the recessive trait). You would then have to breed hetrozygous to heterozygous before you would get any albino offspring. Gimme is so named because it was less than 24 hours after I saw him that I called my friend and said, "GIMME!"



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Maxine "Max" in my opinion is an incredibly beautiful female. Max is of particular interest to me because of her strong yellows and oranges in her ground color. I have no idea if the colors will be carried on to her offspring, but I hope to find out.



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Peaches is a male. He carries strong yellows and oranges in his ground color, especially along the lower edge of his side. He is a beautiful snake, but the most appealing aspect of Peaches is his personality. During maintenance, Peaches will actually crawl out of his enclosure toward me when it is opened. I have grown very found of him.



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Snuggles is a female Ball Python with some very intense color, somewhat reduced pattern, and a great deal of blushing overall.



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Spalding is a female. I picked out Spalding in 2006 to use in my SnakeTalk presentations because of her pleasant temperament, and because she is a prime example of a "normal" Ball Python.


Available for adoption to a good home in the DFW area.
(will not ship - local pick-up ONLY)
Adopted out 30 August, 2009.



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Speckles is a male. I thought Speckles was cool because his pattern is reduced in a unique way. He has the standard Ball Python pattern, but instead of the spots that run down the sides of most Ball Pythons, he has speckles. All of the other snakes either have spots, some spots, or no spots. Speckles is the only one in this group with this granulation down his sides.


Available for adoption to a good home in the DFW area.
(will not ship - local pick-up ONLY)
Adopted out 20 August, 2008.



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Twenty Four is a female. Twenty Four is the subject of a painting and limited edition print I produced in February, 2007. While shooting photos of Ball Pythons, this little girl adopted the namesake defense posture and inspired me. That is her in the banner at the top of this Ball Python section, and there is a link below to see the painting. If anyone is interested, the painting is not for sale. The name Twenty Four comes from the fact that she was the 24th snake I photographed that day and it just stuck.


Available for adoption to a good home in the DFW area.
(will not ship - local pick-up ONLY)
Adopted out 20 August, 2008.

To see the painting, CLICK HERE.



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Widget is a male and has the most reduced pattern of all the Ball Pythons in this group.


Available for adoption to a good home in the DFW area.
(will not ship - local pick-up ONLY)
Adopted out 19 August, 2008.


NOTE: For those who do not know, there are generally three ways snakes come into captivity; captive born/hatched, ranched, and wild caught.

  • Captive Born/Hatched: This is a no brainer. These are offspring from adult snakes, bred in captivity and either born or hatched according to the nature of the snake. For example, Pythons lay eggs, while Boa Constrictors carry their young to term and bear live young. The parents may be captive born/hatched, ranched, or wild caught, but typically the parents are maintained in captivity on a long term basis.
  • Ranched: This is a term applied to snakes born/hatched in captivity from wild caught gravid females (egg laying or live bearing), or hatched from eggs robbed from nests in the wild.
  • Wild Caught: Another no brainer, this term is applied to snakes caught in the wild. Acquiring a wild caught snake is not necessarily a bad thing as fresh genetic material is very important to captive breeding, but there are many difficulties associated with wild caught snakes. Generally, a beginner should not acquire a wild caught snake.
Contact:
John Hunter c/o SnakeTalk.Com
P. O. Box 170413 - Irving, Texas 75017
EMAIL

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